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Yokosuka E14Y build log
#1

I thought in the absence of enough other projects, I might build a semi-scale model of this plane. The air frame is totally scratch built mostly ESP foam along the lines of the Zero but a little bigger at 1.1 meter span.

Working from these 3 views



It's early days yet but here is the wing so far. It still needs to be cut and swept back and dihedral added


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“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#2

Interesting stuff Jason - I've never heard of this machine before, where did you dig it up from?

Steve Murray
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#3

Kevin suggested it to me as a good candidate for a model
It's quite an interesting aircraft historicaly.

Believe it or not, it was launched from the deck of a submarine!!
It was used mostly for recon missions and there were two flights of these over Sydney in WWII. This was in preperation for the well known midgit submarine attack on Sydney Harbour. Its worth noting that this was done with two different planes and that both were damaged either on landing or retrival to the sub and scuttled. So we have two of them sitting on the bottom out of the coast somewhere. On both occasions the crew survived. There were two different crews apparently.
There were several Jap subs equipped with these little sea planes and I think there was over 100 built.

There were recon flights over Melbourne Newcastle Hobart Aucland and Wellington made with these little planes.




“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#4

^^^^^^ LETS HOPE YOUR MODEL doesnt suffer the same fete . we know the crew would survive . dont get me to launch them for you .

patience !!Biggrin paaatience !!Paranoid paaaaaatience Tounge paaaaaaatieeence Lol dooooohhhh !!! Upset


DANGER WIFE CAN READ FORUMS . love you darling . sig changed .
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#5

Sometimes it's preferable to have a float plane for McCoy field Smile


(01-12-2011, 02:42 PM)wingtipper Wrote:  ^^^^^^ LETS HOPE YOUR MODEL doesnt suffer the same fete . we know the crew would survive . dont get me to launch them for you .

I think if it's built light enough and strong enough it should be a surviver.

That's all right It shouldn't need a hand launch, I hope it will take off from water

It probably won't get a lot of flying any way. It won't be much of an areobat or a speedster dragging those big floats through the air.

I've never flown off water so it will be something different.

Smile


“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#6

Nice Job Jason, with those big floats it should be up off the water well.

Steve

What Do You Mean Theres a Throttle Curve ?, Its Either all the way up or all the way down Tongue_smile
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#7

Ive done some more on the floats they are just about finished now except for a bit of a sand

They are nice and big Steve !!
I guess they had to be, this plane was designed to land on the open ocean not a lake or river like most seaplanes

Here's some pics, round off the top surface in a series of flats then blending them into a curve

EPS is very easy to work with a knife but it must be a stiff but thin blade that is RAZOR sharp. Then you can carve it like it was a potato Smile




Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#8

Here's some more pics of the build
some work on the tail and the fuse

   

   

   

   


“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#9

A little more work on the fuse today

   

   

   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#10

Jason, you make shaping foam look so easy, I'm a bit jealous in how you can make a new plane for yourself so quickly. Nice work.... Thumbup




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#11

(09-12-2011, 05:01 PM)Panspermian Wrote:  Jason, you make shaping foam look so easy, I'm a bit jealous in how you can make a new plane for yourself so quickly. Nice work.... Thumbup

(09-12-2011, 05:01 PM)Panspermian Wrote:  Jason, you make shaping foam look so easy, I'm a bit jealous in how you can make a new plane for yourself so quickly. Nice work.... Thumbup

It's not really that hard to do and your right carved foam is a very fast way to make planes. It did take me a while to work out a few basic steps tho.

The main thing to remember it keep it light!! I cant stress this enough This means don't add strength where it's not needed!! It's much better to design a model to handle flying loads than the enormous forces encountered in a crash. Never try and design models to handle a crash. That will only make it heavier than it needs to be and heavier means harder to fly. HARDER TO FLY MEANS more likely to crash! It also makes it harder/slower to build in the first place and harder/slower to repair when it crashes.

My suggested steps in a foam scratch build might be

1) Pick a plane, find a 3 view of it on the net.

2) work out how big you want the model. In this case it 1.1 meter span. That works out to be 6.5 times bigger than the scale of the 3 view when printed.

3) You could make templates for wire cutting the wing and do it your self. It's not difficult and there are lots of tutorials on the net. Or you could just give the dimensions to Colin and for a modest sum he'd cut a very nice set set of wing cores.

4) A little bit of epoxy, glass and brown paper and the foam core wings are ready to be joined and covered with Iron on film or perhaps coated with the water soluble polyurethane Steve B uses. s cut the ailerons straight out of the wing and hing with tape hinges.
Mount the servos, fit control rods/horns, wings are now pretty much ready to be glued to the fuse with epoxy. later to be painted with what ever color scheme.

5) marking out the fuse is quite easy all you need to do is find a pen and a rule. Use the the 3 view to scale dimensions and take your time. "think twice and cut once"

6) First cut or join together pieces of foam to form a rectangular block that is the overall dimensions of the fuse. Use the straightest/squarest edges to take all your sizes from. Allays scale from the same edges. ie from the nose back using the fire wall as a datum draw a straight line along the bottom of the fuse to use as your other datum. draw the same lines on you 3 view then measure everything from these and transfer them to the foam block in the new scale.

7) draw the side profile on the side of the foam block. draw the top profile on the top of the foam block.

8) cut around the side profile using a band saw or jig saw or even a hand held fret saw. You must keep these cuts square this is important and it takes a little effort but it's easy enough if you go slow and take your time.
It helps greatly if the block you start with is nice and square, in fact this is pretty much a must.
when you cut around the side profile don't cut it off completely if you leave it partly attached this way you can use it to hold the block straight when cutting the top profile. then cut through the last little bits later.

9) If the fuse is rounded break all these rounded edges up into 45 degree champhers. then champher those champhers again. you'll see from the pics how I marked these out cut them then marked them and cut them again. once you have the shape as a bunch of facets you can fair them out with a block and glass paper. Go easy so you don't tear out balls of foam it's not that hard. Let me tell you I'm no artist when it comes to carving. I mark then cut to the line I can't transfer a shape by eye. Your cutting can only be as good as your marking out. USE A RAZOR SHARP KNIFE !! get a leather strop and a straight edged boot makers knife. Keep it sharp. I stropped the knife about 5 times making the fuse alone and even more doing the floats.It's very easy with a sharp blade and imposable with a blunt one.................All the usual OH&S about sharp edges applies Smile

10) tail feathers are flat plates cut from 6mm depron control surfaces are hinged with tape hinges. servos are cut into the foam to fit neatly and hot melt glued in. push rods are carbon with z bent wire bound to them with thread soaked in cyano.

11) Pick you motor and ESC mount them I use a piece of ply glued to the fire wall with epoxy and mount the motor to this. Mount the servos control rods landing gear wheels and everything else except the lipos and the receiver.
Landing gear/ float struts will need to be mounted to ply wood load spreading pieces epoxied to the foam fuse.

12) Glue wing to fuse or arrange other means of attachment rubber bands screws ect. If using screws spread the load using 1mm ply pieces glued to the foam.

12) work out where the C of G should be. About 27% of average wing cord back from the leading edge. Mark this place on the wing.

13) Pick a lipo pack suitable for the model, probably the lightest one that will power the motor safely Is a good choice and will probably give a good 5mins of flight time. (unless your name is Samste then double the lipo pack size, quater the flight time and fit on board cryo-cooler)

14) Sit the lipo pack on the fuse in the place that makes the assembled plane balance on the C of G. Hopefully it's under the canopy if it's too far forward then get a slightly heavier pack this will allow it to go back a little. when you get it in the right spot mark around it and carve a pocket that it will fit into. you have to do this last after every thing else is added.

15) mount the receiver under the lipo pack or behind the lipos never in front 'cause the pack will act as a hammer in a crash and mash the receiver.

16) don't try and make it perfect first time just make it straight enough to fly well. It's only going to get dinged at some stage so worry about making the next one better, just get this one in the air and flying well and find out what works.





“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#12

Jason where are you getting the foam blocks from?
What sort of foam are they?

Jet Teng L39(Breitling)
Scratchbuilt F14 Tomcat(Pukin Dogs)
Vector X
Eflite F86 Sabre(Taz Tiger)
Qantas Airbus A380(Nancy-Bird Walton)
Boeing 737-800
ProEDF F16
Falcon 120(Gas Turbine)
Fly Fly F100 Super Sabre
Pheonix Tiger 6
VQ Models P61 Night Fighter
CY Models FW190

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#13

(09-12-2011, 10:08 PM)paulj Wrote:  Jason where are you getting the foam blocks from?
What sort of foam are they?

G'day Paul,
The best EPS foam I've found is M grade from RMAX foam

Here is a link to their web site

http://www.rmax.com.au/index.html

Sometimes I manage to fluke a nice piece of left over packaging foam from work which is handy but it's often not as nice to work with as M grade EPS


“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
Reply
#14

Thanks Jason,
Do you buy direct from them? or do they have retailers close by?

Jet Teng L39(Breitling)
Scratchbuilt F14 Tomcat(Pukin Dogs)
Vector X
Eflite F86 Sabre(Taz Tiger)
Qantas Airbus A380(Nancy-Bird Walton)
Boeing 737-800
ProEDF F16
Falcon 120(Gas Turbine)
Fly Fly F100 Super Sabre
Pheonix Tiger 6
VQ Models P61 Night Fighter
CY Models FW190

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#15

I've always dealt direct with them and they deliver for a reasonable price as well
I've brought as little as a couple of square meters of 50mm thick.

They will happily cut it to size for you as well to what ever thickness you like

hope this helps

Jason

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#16

Thanks mate helps heaps

Jet Teng L39(Breitling)
Scratchbuilt F14 Tomcat(Pukin Dogs)
Vector X
Eflite F86 Sabre(Taz Tiger)
Qantas Airbus A380(Nancy-Bird Walton)
Boeing 737-800
ProEDF F16
Falcon 120(Gas Turbine)
Fly Fly F100 Super Sabre
Pheonix Tiger 6
VQ Models P61 Night Fighter
CY Models FW190

Reply
#17

some more pics of the progress so far
I'm not sure I'll get it all done in time but I'm going to try


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
               

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
Reply
#18

going to need some of your fibre glassing repair skills Jase . might try and pop over tonight , and get you assisting my repairs also . LOL . IF I CAN I'LL GIVE YOU A RING LATER AND SEE IF YOUR FREE . i have a six pack as well .( the bottle type that is )

patience !!Biggrin paaatience !!Paranoid paaaaaatience Tounge paaaaaaatieeence Lol dooooohhhh !!! Upset


DANGER WIFE CAN READ FORUMS . love you darling . sig changed .
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#19

No probs Frank

Catch you then

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#20

Did a little more today



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#21

And a little bit more this evening
The floats are ready to paint, Servo has kindly offered to take on this part of the build so we can hopefully get it closer to being finished so we can do a test flight before the 26th.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#22

Still working on the wings, today they should be finished.
Here's some pics

   

Depton frame wing tips

   

Covered wing tips

   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#23

Here's the wings with ailerons hinged and LE taped with filiment tape

   

And with the wing seat cut into the fuse and the firewall and extra ply for the motor mount bonded on the the nose


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#24



And now the motor mount
about an hours turning and a little milling

and here it is ready to screw to the fire wall


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#25

It's getting there tail plane on elevator hinged and motor mounted


   

Strainge looking thing isn't it ??

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#26

Is that your garage or do you have a super cool boss at work that is in to RC planes?
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#27


I have a great Boss who doesn't mind if I tinker about with RC planes before work or at lunchtime and sometimes after work as well Wink As long as I keep the usual work is rolling along nicely and I clean up my mess. Also happy enough for me to grab any packaging foam that's about to be binned as well Biggrin

Here's a pic of Karl's mustang also from the Lindfield aircraft workshops Smile


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
Reply
#28

(20-01-2012, 08:39 PM)Skidz Wrote:  Is that your garage or do you have a super cool boss at work that is in to RC planes?

back in school days we used to call him "PROF" . (professor) . these days , hes the mad toolmaker. i think they got it right at school !!!

patience !!Biggrin paaatience !!Paranoid paaaaaatience Tounge paaaaaaatieeence Lol dooooohhhh !!! Upset


DANGER WIFE CAN READ FORUMS . love you darling . sig changed .
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#29

(20-01-2012, 09:27 PM)wingtipper Wrote:  
(20-01-2012, 08:39 PM)Skidz Wrote:  Is that your garage or do you have a super cool boss at work that is in to RC planes?

back in school days we used to call him "PROF" . (professor) . these days , hes the mad toolmaker. i think they got it right at school !!!

Not much tooling or machining for me these days only the odd bit and the stuff for my self. Now I'm known as the Ice Berger or just plane old Mr freeze, dealing mostly with liquid gases and gas qualifiers (cryogenics)

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#30

The canopy is almost done. servos are all in linkages are done

It's getting close,


   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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