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So what are we all building during lockdown?
#1
Music 

This seems like a good opportunity to build something or finish off a few old projects. Put together some of those ARfs tucked away inboxes or repair a damaged machine or two.

Post your pictures please Smile




    I’ve been tinkering with a new multi-rotor I began to design just before Christmas. I wanted to make something big enough to carry decent payload.

       

               

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#2

My god man, it’s enormous. What do you plan to lift with this thing, a small human?
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#3

Was a challenge to my self to design and build something that was under the 7kg limit unloaded and could handle a MTOW of 25
Should be able to carry a variety of useful payloads. From pretty much any sort of camera setup to a seed spreader for the farm or a couple of remote sensing systems they are tinkering around with at work.
Nothing for certain yet but I thought “build it and they will come”. I have all the qualifications to fly it commercially up to 25kg so if the opportunity arises I can.


There is no carbon fibre in the airframe and all the antennas are internal except for the GPS.

It’s got a comms link that should be good for more that 10km



Should be able to fly for 45mins if it were loaded with a small camera and a big battery pack

Any way I will be flying it for fun in under 7kg configuration initially. At the moment it weighs just 5.2 with no batteries

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#4

Hi Jason. I would love to see this thing fly it's amazing.
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#5

Ill post some video in the members section shortly bon

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#6

HI Jason and members.
Day one of no Mccoy I replaced the battery in my drill.
   
Sadly I have lots of basic landscaping to do around the house.

One thing I'm looking foward to is getting the CNC setup again but first the garage floor needs to be painted. i'm hoping to get this done when we next get a few fine days.
   
I mainly use the CNC to cut out indoor depron aircraft but it also cuts plywood. This is a motor test stand I made a couple of years ago using FRsky telemetry.
   
If you have any Ideas then start with a CAD program. I use Qcad (2.5D) for the CNC and Fusion360 for the 3D printer.

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#7

Do you intend on doing Uber eats deliveries with that???

secant0giveThis seems like a good opportunity to build something or finish off a few old projects. Put together some of those ARfs tucked away inboxes or repair a damaged machine or two.

Post your pictures please Smile




    I’ve been tinkering with a new multi-rotor I began to design just before Christmas. I wanted to make something big enough to carry decent payload.

Gravity sucks, or should I say, is the downfall of all things flying. It's the way it's controlled that makes the end memorable or not.
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#8

Busboy Wrote:Do you intend on doing Uber eats deliveries with that???

secant0giveThis seems like a good opportunity to build something or finish off a few old projects. Put together some of those ARfs tucked away inboxes or repair a damaged machine or two.

Post your pictures please Smile




    I’ve been tinkering with a new multi-rotor I began to design just before Christmas. I wanted to make something big enough to carry decent payload.
No Not Uber eats Smile
I was thinking of using it for spreading seed on the paddocks over at Streaky Bay.

There's a trend in farming with some crops where you can seed the next crop just before you havest the one that is currently growing so you use the mulch from the first crop to cover the seed for the new crop. The only problem is how to seed without damaging whats already growing. A big multi would solve that.

   I was watching a video the other day, I'll see if I can find the link, where they sprayed about 300 acres with 4 big DJI multi-rotors in in just 3 1/2 hours.  to imagine the size of that area, just think a piece of land like that is about 6km if you walk around the boundary.  Imagine spraying all of that in an afternoon!! There was a team of 3 people two pilots and one support guy. Probably not entirely legal to do here because you can only fly one at once. Also there is quite some CASA red tape in doing arial spraying in Australia.  Another case of bureaucracy killing off Australia's innovation in industry.

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#9

I have been and continue to keep myself occupied with projects.

I have just transplanted my HK Vampire bits into a new Vampire that I had been buying as spares over the months when they came on sales...so new Vampire in RCAF colours for under 100 dollaredoos.

I have repaired my 800mm Me 262 and 1600mm P-51 Mustang and have pulled my Meteor down from the roof ready for post CCP Virus action.

My Space Shuttle 900mm is next, I started it in 2017 so I should really finish it....

Been playing with my vintage Tamiya RC Car collection and some new releases with my son. I may pull the Nitro car out next week.

Biggest success though has been in Zinc plating the scuff plates on my EH..Amazing what Vinegar, Epsom Salts and 1.5 volts can do...

Found out Hydrochloric Acids (at 50/50) eats into cement. Doh!

I am going to jump on the simulator later and have a virtual fly at McCoy.

Cheers All,

Andrew
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#10

Here’s a little project That’s nearly ready for a test flight
It’s a HK trifecta with a micro APM.
I’ve had the flight controller for ages with gps power monitor and telemetry
It was easy enough to set up as a trycopter. I’ve never flown a trycopter before so it should be a bit of fun.
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#11

(30-03-2020, 11:21 AM)srl Wrote:  HI Jason and members.
Day one of no Mccoy I replaced the battery in my drill.

Sadly I have lots of basic landscaping to do around the house.

One thing I'm looking foward to is getting the CNC setup again but first the garage floor needs to be painted. i'm hoping to get this done when we next get a few fine days.

I mainly use the CNC to cut out indoor depron aircraft but it also cuts plywood. This is a motor test stand I made a couple of years ago using FRsky telemetry.

If you have any Ideas then start with a CAD program. I use Qcad (2.5D) for the CNC and Fusion360 for the 3D printer.




I like the thrust measuring jig That's a ripper!! and not difficult to make at all

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#12

Almost have my 2.3m Airtractor 802 complete.  My first scratch build, and it's definitely taken longer that I expected. I haven't drawn the most comprehensive plans in the world, but     but there has been a lot to figure out to hit my target weight of 3.5kg and still have a strong build.
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#13

(16-04-2020, 11:03 PM)ianw Wrote:  Almost have my 2.3m Airtractor 802 complete.  My first scratch build, and it's definitely taken longer that I expected. I haven't drawn the most comprehensive plans in the world, but but there has been a lot to figure out to hit my target weight of 3.5kg and still have a strong build.

   Wow Ian That is pretty light for a 2.3m span model. something that size could fly nicely at over double that weight. My AT6 Texan was over 7kg and that was only 82" span.
That is going to be a really nice forgiving model to fly. Great Job!! I look forward to seeing it.

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#14

It's been a challenge. Amazing how the weight wants to creep up. I worked it all out roughly at the start and thought 3.5 kg was not too difficult, but by the end I'm sweating over every gram. If only I could get that extra 30g out of the tail that I put in months ago!!!
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#15

I must have too much time on my hands as I dragged out the old airbrush and had a go at the exhausts.  Not perfect, but do look a bit like the discoloured titanium or stainless pipes used in real life. I'm simulating the military version of the Airtractor 802 as used by a few dodgy operators in countries like Jordan.  In Jordan they have scrubbed out the registration details on some of the aircraft, maybe because they are involved in suspect operations, (see image).

I just put it on the scales complete, and was shattered to find it had crept up to 4.2kg. I knew I'd gone a bit over 3.5, but wow the small bits and pieces add up. At 4.2 it has a cubic wing loading of 8, so should still fly OK.


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#16

WOW Ian, that exhaust looks great, can't wait to see it in the air....

Gravity sucks, or should I say, is the downfall of all things flying. It's the way it's controlled that makes the end memorable or not.
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#17

(04-05-2020, 10:47 AM)ianw Wrote:  I must have too much time on my hands as I dragged out the old airbrush and had a go at the exhausts.  Not perfect, but do look a bit like the discoloured titanium or stainless pipes used in real life. I'm simulating the military version of the Airtractor 802 as used by a few dodgy operators in countries like Jordan.  In Jordan they have scrubbed out the registration details on some of the aircraft, maybe because they are involved in suspect operations, (see image).

I just put it on the scales complete, and was shattered to find it had crept up to 4.2kg.  I knew I'd gone a bit over 3.5, but wow the small bits and pieces add up.  At 4.2 it has a cubic wing loading of 8, so should still fly OK.

It will fly beautifully at 4.2 probably even better than at 3.5 you have nothing to worry about with that weight Ian. It would fly nicely even at 6Kg Believe me you will love it !! And it's looking good too!!

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#18

I've been flying the trifecta around the back yard a bit and at lunch time when I have been going in to work.
I like it a lot and I think three props has something to recommend it. Since I have a few motors and ESCs spare from the big octocopter I thought I might design a bit bigger tri-copter. One with an optimum flying weight of about 5.5kg and a MTOW of about 7 to take full advantage of the 7kg weight class. The bare frame is looking like it will be under 1.4 kg so at 5.5 kg it should have better than a 3kg split between batteries and payload. (that leaves over 600g enough for motors escs props etc) With 3Kg of batteries it should be able to fly for close to an hour. which is pretty awesome for a multi rotor.

   Here's some pics of the progress so far. It's mostly just CAD work at this stage hopefully I'll get the parts laser cut in the next week or so and start sticking it together.
   
   
   

These are the gears for the tilt mechanism on the tail rotor.
   
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#19

There aren’t too many patents for well resolved tilt rotor mechanisms in tricopters. If yours is sound you may wish to investigate protecting it. Can’t wait to see how it turns out. Make sure you factor for the sizeable torque generated on the tail boom and mechanism by the gyroscopic effect of the spinning mass, which I assume becomes an ever greater issue as the scale increases.
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#20

The tricopter is looking exciting, like Jason B, I'm keen to see it fly. I hope your weight calculations are better than mine, I still suspect a possum or a rat has stowed away somewhere and i just can't find it.
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#21

I flew the Airtractor on Saturday.  It's the perfect big plane for our field.  Takes off in a few meters and goes wherever you point it, (but is not super easy to land on the spot as it carries more speed than I am used to flying the tiger moth).  I left the flaps alone, can experiment with those later.  It's a bit of a beast taxiing in a breeze and could do with a larger rudder, (or a steerable tail wheel).
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#22

(17-05-2020, 12:08 PM)ianw Wrote:  I flew the Airtractor on Saturday.  It's the perfect big plane for our field.  Takes off in a few meters and goes wherever you point it, (but is not super easy to land on the spot as it carries more speed than I am used to flying the tiger moth).  I left the flaps alone, can experiment with those later.  It's a bit of a beast taxiing in a breeze and could do with a larger rudder, (or a steerable tail wheel).
Brilliant I was certain it would fly nicey
you do have to allow a little more room to land big models.
i think the flaps will help slow it down. To try them out take it up high back off the power a little and deploy the flaps. Most likely it will pitch up a little and you’ll have to put in some down to stop it slowing too much.
 One you get a feel for how much if Amy down it needs you can mix that amount of trim in.

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#23

(11-05-2020, 01:17 AM)Quadzimodo Wrote:  There aren’t too many patents for well resolved tilt rotor mechanisms in tricopters. If yours is sound you may wish to investigate protecting it. Can’t wait to see how it turns out. Make sure you factor for the sizeable torque generated on the tail boom and mechanism by the gyroscopic effect of the spinning mass, which I assume becomes an ever greater issue as the scale increases.
I think the mechanism will work fine It’s all together now and looks pretty good. The servo is a HXT 12 it is pretty fast and has 10kg/cm torque at 5v and 12kg/cm at 6v. I’m hoping it will do the job ok. I use them on all my large scale race planes haven’t had a problem yet. The tail boom is incredibly stiff. I don’t think that will be a problem at all. Not sure about patenting it. It may not be novel enough. Any way if it’s good the chinease will copy it any way. It’s a good design because all the torque is put through the gears non of the torque load goes through the shaft. It’s left just to retain the nacell and provide the pivot. Spreads the load through the whole structure and means you can build it very light.

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#24

Here’s some pics of the tilting arrangement
   
   
   
   
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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#25

Here are a couple more pics of the machine under construction
It so nice to be able to post some pictures of my work. One of the benefits of building for my self
A lot of the stuf I’ve done I cant post pictures of.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw your machine at the ground and miss.”

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your thoughts turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."  ~Leonardo Da Vinci
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